A how-to guide on getting more out of your board

A how-to guide on getting more out of your board

One of the really nice things about my job at the Bayer Center is the abundant amount of learning opportunities around me. Accordingly, yesterday I sat in on Sally Mizerak’s “Using a Dashboard” class.

For those of us not in the automotive sector, an organizational “dashboard” is likely a “user-friendly, often color coded summary chart(s) of the key indicators of an organization’s performance.” I liken it to CliffNotes for staff, management, board members, donors, etc.

The “art” of designing your organization’s dashboard really depends on what story/message you’re trying to summarize. For instance, Scott Leff and I have been busy recently helping organizations reduce the stacks of internal financial reports they disseminate to board members and instead replace these trees with a single, colorful, summary financial report. From this report, board members can quickly glean how the organization is performing (actual vs. realized budget), how much cash is available, and how the organization is financially performing relative to its local and national peers (benchmarking) and its own past results (trending).

[Editor’s note: My colleague Jeff Forster points out that he posted about Dashboards last month with two big points: 1) dashboards aren’t just about financial measures, although they’re obviously quantifiable and 2) CRM databases have thrust dashboards to the fore as though they’re something new under the sun (but they’re not). Also, Jeff and me rode together in CDCP’s Pedal Pittsburgh (50+ mile) ride last week and spent much of the time discussing this blog entry and nonprofit dashboards, kind of.]

One way to get the internal dashboard dialogue started is to ask yourself if your board’s financial reports are telling the story that you are hoping to convey. If the answer is “yes,” then next ask yourself if you can do a better job of summarizing this information into one report?

If you think you can be doing better, then you probably are not using your board’s time wisely. (You’re supposed to be talking about mission-related information and not spending all your time on financial minutia.) A suggestion – consider putting aside a few hours to spend with your staff/colleagues/Finance Committee and conference on what financial picture/story you’d like to convey to your board. The benefits you’ll get in return from a more mission-focused board will far exceed your time investment.

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